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FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Do you need Help ?
How can I make a tour reservation?
  • Feel free to contact us via E-mail or phone as it is mentioned in Contact Us page.
Should I worry about Medicaments and Health concerns?
  • There are no required inoculations needed for Morocco. Drink only bottled water. Each town in Morocco has at least one pharmacy where you can buy most of necessary medicaments, pills, condoms and any other health care product. If you must have any cares in particular bring your own.
What should I pack?
  • Bring comfortable clothes and shoes, as you will be doing some walking in the cities.
  •  We recommend a hat that will protect you from the sun, and a light jacket or fleece as it will get chilly at night, especially in the desert. Women do not need to cover their heads, and jeans are fine for both men and women. Some of the rooms in Riads (hotels in the old cities) have lovely romantic lighting, but if you prefer to read in your room, you may want to bring a book light. Don’t forget your camera!
Who should I tip?
  • It is customary to tip for good service in Morocco, as you would at home.
  • Tourism is a key pillar in Morocco’s economy, and many people depend on tips to supplement their wages, but you should not feel pressured to tip anyone if you are not satisfied with the service you have received.
What is the electrical system in Morocco?
  • Morocco voltage is 220V, 50 Hz (two pin round plugs). Always check your laptop or electronic items to make sure they can handle 100-240 volts
What about women travelling Morocco?
  • From the city of Marrakech where anything goes, to the Sahara village where women dress in black with one eye showing from behind a veil, Morocco is a country of many contrasts. Foreign women travel quite safely but attract attention everywhere, most often to buy something or be offered a “service” (especially in the big cities, take that offer as you may!). As Muslims, men should not touch a woman he doesn’t know. If a foreign woman wants respect she should not tolerate his long handshake or his lingering hand on her arm or anywhere else. Dress as you do at home but conservatively to gain respect. Foreigners are treated with the duality of wonderful hospitality or as a chance for financial gain. The invitation to visit and have tea or dine with a family is a memorable experience. But measure invitations with obligation. Traditions are strong and old ways are practiced. A good attitude and a sense of sharing and humor go a long way to breaking down preconceptions of foreigners and are always appreciated by Moroccans.
What can I expect while touring Morocco?
  • Travelling in a foreign culture and developing country such as Morocco can be a delightfully rewarding and challenging experience. African cultures have much to teach those of us who come from the modern world offering opportunities to combine enjoyment and understanding with learning new and ancient ways of living and survival.Romantic meanderings aside, Moroccans work very hard to make visitors feel welcome and provide what you need but patience and understanding is needed as well. It is a developing country and modern amenities are still being built or are non existent in many places outside the city. Sometimes visitor’s expectations are not understood by a culture that has little or no direct experience of them so instead, you might receive an interpretation of your request with interesting consequences.
  • Life moves a lot slower than what Westerners are used to, and this must be taken into consideration when something is taking too much time. Life is slow by nature and things do get done eventually. It’s best to approach Morocco with an appreciation of cultural differences, sounds, smells, language, expression, and light, relaxing, enjoying and accepting. Remember laughter speaks the same language everywhere.
Do I need to be able to speak Arabic?

The simple answer is no but, as when a guest in any country, an attempt to converse in the native language is much appreciated by the locals.

  •  Staff in all the Riads and Hotels, particularly those in the bigger towns and cities, is multi-lingual speaking English, French, Spanish and Arabic and maybe Berber too. In the more rural communities Arabic, Berber and French tend to dominate. In the far north Spanish is widely understood.
  •  Most urban Moroccans understand some English; however, you should not assume that English will be understood and it can also be useful to know some French.
Can I smoke and drink alcohol in Morocco?
  • Moroccan law prohibits smoking in most public buildings. At your accommodation, there will usually be an area (e.g. roof terrace) where smoking is permitted.
  •  Although Muslims are forbidden to drink alcohol, Morocco is a moderate Islamic country and you are likely to feel free to drink in moderation in private or where alcohol is being served. In medinas alcohol cannot be purchased in shops, although many Riads and Hotels offer it. Some restaurants serve alcoholic drinks and there are a few bars in cities and some towns. Outside medinas alcohol may be obtained in some shops and supermarkets and in tourist hotels, especially the larger ones.
  •  Moroccan wines are often excellent and a small range of pleasant Moroccan lagers and, on occasion, imported beers and wines are available. Most accommodations are perfectly happy for you to bring your own if they do not serve alcohol.
  •  In line with our policies of responsible tourism, please do not drink in public places that do not serve alcohol. You may wish to buy duty free spirits on your way into the country to drink in your accommodation.
Can I e-mail and use a mobile phone in Morocco?
  • There are plenty of reasonably priced internet cafes in all the cities and large towns in Morocco. Also you will not face difficulty in finding a local café with Wi-Fi, because it has become a commercial necessity for café owners to supply their cafés with Wi-Fi which is most of the time free. Hotel and Riads also have Wi-Fi, so getting an access to the internet is not a big issue in Morooco Morocco has generally good mobile coverage (the best in Africa) and has roaming agreements with world mobile phone companies, although roaming charges are relatively high.
  •  The cheapest way to phone home using a mobile is to buy an SIM card which is remarkably cheap and practical to use, so long as you e-mail the number to anyone at home who might wish to be in touch or use Skype or other similar internet based system where Wi-Fi is available.
  •  You may be surprised how you can get coverage in many parts of the High Atlas and in the middle of the desert.
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